The All Important Y Seam   4 comments

Hidy Ho Good Neighbors,

I feel like I beat this subject to death, but it’s that important. Heck, it’s critical to fly fishing success.  Whether your nymphing, dry-dropping, mini-rigging, skinny rigging, or dry fly fishing, keeping those flies flowing like the naturals in the Y seam to positioned fish is a skill to master.

Think of drinking your latte this morning, your mug went directly to your mug! In other words, you didn’t have to think twice about the path to your mouth, nor did you have to move to collide with the cup.  It flowed to your mouth naturally. I contend, that if feeding fish have to move to eat your flies that are drifting unnaturally in the current, they will most often pass yours up to eat the naturals that are flowing perfectly. Fish see thousands of natural bugs drifting in the currents every day, if you can’t match that drift, you’re in for long days.

The Y seam is rarely if ever a straight line, it’s usually drifting to or away from you. Often it’s a combination of both, and fish set-up in advantageous spots, that make feeding on “real” bugs almost effortless.  Don’t make them work for a meal.  Strive to stay at proper depths and speeds as you stay in the Y seam.

I have uploaded a video for you to watch at:   https://youtu.be/Up8EUzO0RxM

As always, find this and more explained in my latest book, Hidden in Plain View (Amazon)

Hit me with questions and comments, share the video with your fishing buddies, and Fear No Water!

Directly to this face! Master the Y seam drift!

 

 

 

4 responses to “The All Important Y Seam

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  1. ran into some perfect water like that where on one hand the flow was right to left…at the same time it was pushing to the bank. placement is the real art and especially once a “bobber” comes into play it is all about mending.

  2. Is it easier to stay in the Y seam when euro nymphing or using a suspension method? I would think there is less of an issue with euro nymphing since the drifts tend to be shorter and there is less surface tension.

    • Hi Barry,

      Thanks for the question. I do think it’s easier at the hands of a skilled euro angler to stay in the same Y seam throughout their drift. That being said, a suspension rig, if drifted expertly, can give the euro rig a run for it’s money in the overall quality of a longer, more consistent drift. So, it’s kinda apples and oranges, and there are some trade offs, but yes, I think euro lends itself to great Y seam tracking when done expertly.

      Thanks again,

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